José "The Special One" Mourinho

mario.santon

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agree with Pravesh, perhaps.. all these rumors are let to be discussed, so people are pretty much leave the players alone..
Balotelli issues are forgotten and overrided by Mou's transfer talk
 

spiderninja

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I think so too. There is less attack on Inter and the players because the media attention is all drawn to him
If Mou confirms to stay now, they will target Maicon and Balotelli, and maybe Eto'o too about his lack of goals.
Also about Jose's chicken tactic and about scudetto 2006 which could be handed back to Jube. They will try anything to unsettle Inter
Maybe Mourinho already tell Moratti and his players that he will stay next season, they all just play acting now
 

Nero Indigo

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I think so too. There is less attack on Inter and the players because the media attention is all drawn to him
If Mou confirms to stay now, they will target Maicon and Balotelli, and maybe Eto'o too about his lack of goals.
Also about Jose's chicken tactic and about scudetto 2006 which could be handed back to Jube. They will try anything to unsettle Inter
Maybe Mourinho already tell Moratti and his players that he will stay next season, they all just play acting now

Spiderninja.... This is the first time I don't actually want to choke you :lol:. Good post :thumbsup:
 

Nyall

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The way I see it, Jose could have possibly told his players that he's staying another season or more and they should focus solely on destroying Siena, and laugh at these rumors which are coming from nowhere.
 

delaurentis

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Yes I have been thinking that aswell.... Inter's next 2 games are Historic and nobody NOBODY is talking about Inter winning a treble. There is no pressure at all on the players.. I remember in the past the pressure on games was unbearable through the press for Inter. Now nobody is talking , It is all about Mourinho leaving or not.
 

blackmore

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The way I see it, Jose could have possibly told his players that he's staying another season or more and they should focus solely on destroying Siena, and laugh at these rumors which are coming from nowhere.

wow dude i was just thinking the exact same thing...
 

La Brujita

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UCL final: Mourinho, a ticket for charity
Friday, 14 May 2010 18:56:01


MILAN - His name is Paolo Sacco, he was born in Milan in 1987 and he is an Inter season ticket holder (third tier, sector 350, row 6, seat 24). Yesterday morning at 09:45 he was the first person in the queue to buy a ticket for the Champions League final in Madrid.

Paolo will have to spend a few more euros than he thought, but he is happy to do so because the 225 euros for his Category 2 ticket will go to charity (he will choose which charity in the coming days).

All the remaining available tickets will go on sale at the branch of BPM in via Massaua on Saturday morning (5,000 of them are available to season ticket holders and Inter Club members). José Mourinho was particularly proud to hear that many people had started queueing two days before Saturday, and decided to give a ticket to the first in the queue.

"I cannot satisfy everybody, but with this gesture I want to show my affection for them," he said. "This is my applause for the passion of all the Nerazzurri fans. But the boy will have to prove that he has given the money to charity."

Lucky guy :)
 

marchs10

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you guys are correct about mou fully taking all thoughts off of treble talk and only on him leaving. another brilliant mind game from jose! the papers have not mentioned the word 'treble'
 

Puma

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Just beautiful! You can coach any club in the world Jose but the Nerazzurri faithful are unrivalled and there is no club like Inter.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Paolo Sacco meets Mourinho in Appiano
Saturday, 15 May 2010 13:02:56

APPIANO GENTILE - Paolo Sacco's dream journey towards Madrid continues. The Inter season ticket holder, who was given a ticket for the Champions League final by José Mourinho yesterday, visited Inter's training ground this morning to thank the Portuguese coach in person.

"I have with me the money to give to charity, as the boss asked me too. I can give it to the captain's PUPI Foundation right away," said Paolo, who was the first person in the queue for the 5,000 remaining tickets.

Javier Zanetti explained to Paolo what he needs to do: make the donation at the PUPI headquarters in via Corno di Cavento, 7, in Milan.

"I will go on Monday," assured Paolo, who then went into the press room for his meeting with Mourinho. And the Inter coach wanted to know everything about the season ticket holder, who works as a waiter in Milan. "If you want I will come here to serve the players," he said. "How will I go to Madrid? By car, coach, or bike, but thanks to you, I will be there."

"Always behave well," said Mourinho. "You are an Inter fan, you are a lucky boy, you can see the training session with your friend. Now concentrate on the game in Siena."

Trembling, Paolo embraced the coach and whispered: "My voice, my whole voice for the team. Always." Bravo Paolo.

http://www.inter.it/aas/news/reader?N=33905&L=en

http://www.inter.it/aas/img/130546.jpg
 
Last edited:

blackmore

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great stuff from jose but i hope this isnt his way of signing off with us.
 

Stefan

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Mou responds to ranieri calling him boring.

Mourinho: "Conosco solo la Nausea di Sartre"
Sabato, 15 Maggio 2010 13:59:17 [permanent link]permalink
[FOTO Sabato, 15 Maggio 2010 13:59:17]

APPIANO GENTILE - "La noia di Ranieri? Che cosa è la noia di Ranieri? Ho studiato e conosco solo 'La Nausea' di Jean-Paul Sartre, filosofo, premio Nobel, ma anche grande appassionato di calcio": questa la risposta di José Mourinho, affidata a www.inter.it, alle dichiarazioni rilasciate dal tecnico della Roma, Claudio Ranieri, durante la conferenza stampa di oggi.

Translated:http://translate.google.com/transla.../reader?N=48324&L=it&sl=it&tl=en&hl=&ie=UTF-8
 

SneijderIsGod

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Sunday 9 May, 2010
Blog: Jerkonomics

Everyone condemns the escalating tension in Italian football, but Susy Campanale notes people never miss a chance to act like a jerk

Italian football has always been a hotbed of tension, passion and borderline insanity, but really this season it is going too far. Everywhere you turn there is sport treated like warfare, whether it’s Lazio fans on a suicide mission to blow up Roma’s Scudetto hopes or Francesco Totti going ninja on Mario Balotelli. Everybody blames everyone else, but the truth is people never miss a chance to act like a jerk.

Take the Coppa Italia Final. Inter won fair and square, we saw the ‘old’ Roma of petulant, childish behaviour that was so familiar before Claudio Ranieri took charge. The Coach spoke highly of his opponents after the final whistle and was a perfect example of fair play. So did Marco Materazzi really need to gleefully thank Philippe Mexes on camera for the “helping hand” on Diego Milito’s goal? Did Luca Toni have to moan about the referee when quite frankly Nicolas Burdisso should’ve gone off in the first half for a series of awful tackles? Was it entirely necessary for Cristian Chivu to make a lewd gesture to his former fans, or for Rodrigo Taddei to clatter into Sulley Muntari when the ball was lost? People, you are not helping.

Then Jose Mourinho weighs in. Ranieri makes a fairly valid point about the “ticking time bombs” of the Special One’s Press conferences, which are quite obviously designed to create a siege mentality. Hardly a new insight. So did Mou really have to respond by dragging up the same ‘loser’ comments about Chelsea he made when he first arrived in Italy? This had nothing to do with the debate at all. People ask why Mourinho is so revered in England and yet despised in the Italian media – it’s because of statements like that, the same ones he made without prompting the moment he touched down in Milan. Ranieri is a gentleman and he does not deserve such low blows.

It goes right the way through Serie A, this seemingly irresistible urge to act like a total jerk. Genoa-Milan must be played behind closed doors, because 15 years after a tragic event, the home fans still won’t allow the Rossoneri into the city without threatening violent repercussions. Livorno-Lazio is more like a political rally than a football match. Fiorentina fans have pledged not to turn up to the stadium for the derby with Siena, but police are on high alert because these same supporters would be willing to get out of bed for an arranged fight with visiting ultras. Andrea Pirlo childishly stated on camera he was cheering on Barcelona against Inter in the Champions League semi-final for no reason other than pure spite, while Totti's infamous thumbs down after the Rome derby did nothing but inflame an already tense situation. And we wonder why the fans are so vindictive...

Everyone is so quick to condemn the climate of tension in Italian football, but who is ready to take a step back and stop fuelling the fire? And yes, before anyone writes in, I delight in winding people up too, but the media only report on what the Coaches and players say. If they start acting with decorum, so will the Press. We'd love to write about football, it's just there is precious little of it around at the moment amid the verbal fisticuffs.

http://www.football-italia.net/blogs/sc112.html



I have been a lurker on this forum for a long time but never posted. However, the current discussion has led me to shed my toga of invisibility and finally say something.

Puma, with all due respect while your last long piece was quite eloquent, I think you are failing to see the bigger picture as to what is in the interest of Inter. Also, you quoted Susy Campanale to buttress your point about Mourinho being disrespectful ? You know her antecedents, right ? And you think she is going to be neutral on these matters ?

The first instincts of Italy, like for many countries, is parochialism. Who are you to make you think you are a better coach than the ones we have ? Especially in Italy, the land of coaches ?! In fact it's this attempt to confront this kind of thinking that led Mourinho to utter his infamous "I am not one from the bottle, I am a special one" comment. The question that precipitated that quote was the journalist asking for his reaction to Ranieri's departing words that Mourinho would suffer to adapt to England. Of course wouldn't you concede that Ranieri said that purely out of spite as he had just been relieved of his duties? And aren't such words meant to undermine the new guy ? If it was someone with shaky confidence and failed to respond to the comment appropriately, that would probably have unraveled the winning mentality he was looking to instill in his team and his efforts to exorcise their "beautiful loser" reputation. Because at the first sign of problem, the players will remember Ranieri's words and wonder if the coach isn't truly having problems adapting. So the full reply was to tell Ranieri via the press that he had beaten teams from England, Spain and even Ranieri's own Italy on his way to the CL trophy and that he was not some clueless alternative.

Ranieri- your so-called gentleman has always been a "voyeur" (that word again) when it comes to Mourinho. After all, he won't have been sacked at Chelsea were it not for the latter. I'll give you two instances. First after he lost a friendly, he said without any provocation whatsoever, "I am not like Mourinho who has to win for his self-esteem". This led to Mourinho's first verbal assault about how Ranieri was 70 and had never won anything significant. The second one is the latest about Mourinho's method being a ticking time-bomb, which leads me to the justification of why I think Puma's piece abjectly failed to see what was in Inter's interest; If you as the leader of a group blithely accepts someone publicly undermining your method of working with millionaire star players who can revolt anytime, you should pack up and go home because the next time you have a quarrel with one of your boys, don't be surprised if he quotes Ranieri's words verbatim back at you. This is probably why Mourinho responded with overwhelming force, as he is wont to do and the funny thing is that I am sure Ranieri will never learn the lesson because he knows most people are suckers and will keep calling Ranieri the gentleman anyway irrespective of the merits of the case. You notice this is the second time, I have brought up the possibility that Ranieri's word could be veritably used to undermine harmony in Mourinho's team. It's the height of naivete to think that Ranieri wasn't similarly trying to play the mind games that is globally-acknowledged to be Mourinho's forte.

Of course, this is no excuse of Mourinho. Someone made a very cogent statement and wondered whether his results couldn't be achieved with less rancor. In that case, to each his own. As for me, I enjoy most of the spat. But, for instance, I thought it was unnecessary what he said about Del Neri's stint at Porto, what he said about Jesualdo Ferreira (Porto's coach), his comments about Reading's ambulance service after Cech's incident. But something like the handcuff gesture is so lame and mild that there is no denying FIGC wanted to teach him a lesson and must have hoped that Morratti will ditch him if the problem becomes too much. I mean Di Canio got a 10,000 Euro fine for a Nazi salute for Christ's sake. NAZI-F*KING Salute versus handcuff. Take your pick.

And do you even notice that in most cases, it's someone starting it off with Mourinho and yet he gets blamed? Ancelotti ridiculed his playing career and no one said anything (Gabriel Marcotti, the respected Times of London and Wall Street Journal columnist actually defended Carlo, calling the comment a joke. I wonder if the person on the receiving end of that joke thought so). Lo Monaco claimed he was going to smash his teeth and there was no uproar. Napoli's president for no reason said he had no need for him except to act in his movies yet no one said anything. When he moans about England all the time, it's because the game in England probably thrives less on this 24/7 football talk as it does in Italy and most of his mouth-offs were more amusing. And do you notice that rarely do you find a President in England, idle enough to start talking about how a club should be ashamed of its victory? Did anybody in Italy condemn Sensi ? What if an Inter player brutishly hacked an opponent down like Totti did ? All Balotelli ever does is flop and put his finger to his lips, yet when he was savagely kicked by Roma's legend, even respected coaches came out to defend him.

It is certainly true that there are coaches who MAY achieve Mourinho's triumphs with less rancor but as Luka once noted, they will throw us to the dogs at the first sign of weakness. If you don't appreciate how much he plays the role of Moggi/Sensi/Lo Monaco for us, you should at least please not knock it. After all we all know Moratti is too much of the "real gentleman" to wallow in their dirty game.
 

Inter Inter

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I have been a lurker on this forum for a long time but never posted. However, the current discussion has led me to shed my toga of invisibility and finally say something.

Puma, with all due respect while your last long piece was quite eloquent, I think you are failing to see the bigger picture as to what is in the interest of Inter. Also, you quoted Susy Campanale to buttress your point about Mourinho being disrespectful ? You know her antecedents, right ? And you think she is going to be neutral on these matters ?

The first instincts of Italy, like for many countries, is parochialism. Who are you to make you think you are a better coach than the ones we have ? Especially in Italy, the land of coaches ?! In fact it's this attempt to confront this kind of thinking that led Mourinho to utter his infamous "I am not one from the bottle, I am a special one" comment. The question that precipitated that quote was the journalist asking for his reaction to Ranieri's departing words that Mourinho would suffer to adapt to England. Of course wouldn't you concede that Ranieri said that purely out of spite as he had just been relieved of his duties? And aren't such words meant to undermine the new guy ? If it was someone with shaky confidence and failed to respond to the comment appropriately, that would probably have unraveled the winning mentality he was looking to instill in his team and his efforts to exorcise their "beautiful loser" reputation. Because at the first sign of problem, the players will remember Ranieri's words and wonder if the coach isn't truly having problems adapting. So the full reply was to tell Ranieri via the press that he had beaten teams from England, Spain and even Ranieri's own Italy on his way to the CL trophy and that he was not some clueless alternative.

Ranieri- your so-called gentleman has always been a "voyeur" (that word again) when it comes to Mourinho. After all, he won't have been sacked at Chelsea were it not for the latter. I'll give you two instances. First after he lost a friendly, he said without any provocation whatsoever, "I am not like Mourinho who has to win for his self-esteem". This led to Mourinho's first verbal assault about how Ranieri was 70 and had never won anything significant. The second one is the latest about Mourinho's method being a ticking time-bomb, which leads me to the justification of why I think Puma's piece abjectly failed to see what was in Inter's interest; If you as the leader of a group blithely accepts someone publicly undermining your method of working with millionaire star players who can revolt anytime, you should pack up and go home because the next time you have a quarrel with one of your boys, don't be surprised if he quotes Ranieri's words verbatim back at you. This is probably why Mourinho responded with overwhelming force, as he is wont to do and the funny thing is that I am sure Ranieri will never learn the lesson because he knows most people are suckers and will keep calling Ranieri the gentleman anyway irrespective of the merits of the case. You notice this is the second time, I have brought up the possibility that Ranieri's word could be veritably used to undermine harmony in Mourinho's team. It's the height of naivete to think that Ranieri wasn't similarly trying to play the mind games that is globally-acknowledged to be Mourinho's forte.

Of course, this is no excuse of Mourinho. Someone made a very cogent statement and wondered whether his results couldn't be achieved with less rancor. In that case, to each his own. As for me, I enjoy most of the spat. But, for instance, I thought it was unnecessary what he said about Del Neri's stint at Porto, what he said about Jesualdo Ferreira (Porto's coach), his comments about Reading's ambulance service after Cech's incident. But something like the handcuff gesture is so lame and mild that there is no denying FIGC wanted to teach him a lesson and must have hoped that Morratti will ditch him if the problem becomes too much. I mean Di Canio got a 10,000 Euro fine for a Nazi salute for Christ's sake. NAZI-F*KING Salute versus handcuff. Take your pick.

And do you even notice that in most cases, it's someone starting it off with Mourinho and yet he gets blamed? Ancelotti ridiculed his playing career and no one said anything (Gabriel Marcotti, the respected Times of London and Wall Street Journal columnist actually defended Carlo, calling the comment a joke. I wonder if the person on the receiving end of that joke thought so). Lo Monaco claimed he was going to smash his teeth and there was no uproar. Napoli's president for no reason said he had no need for him except to act in his movies yet no one said anything. When he moans about England all the time, it's because the game in England probably thrives less on this 24/7 football talk as it does in Italy and most of his mouth-offs were more amusing. And do you notice that rarely do you find a President in England, idle enough to start talking about how a club should be ashamed of its victory? Did anybody in Italy condemn Sensi ? What if an Inter player brutishly hacked an opponent down like Totti did ? All Balotelli ever does is flop and put his finger to his lips, yet when he was savagely kicked by Roma's legend, even respected coaches came out to defend him.

It is certainly true that there are coaches who MAY achieve Mourinho's triumphs with less rancor but as Luka once noted, they will throw us to the dogs at the first sign of weakness. If you don't appreciate how much he plays the role of Moggi/Sensi/Lo Monaco for us, you should at least please not knock it. After all we all know Moratti is too much of the "real gentleman" to wallow in their dirty game.


BRILLIANT!

I couldn't have said it better.

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:thumbsup
:star::star::star::star::star:
 

Nero Indigo

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I have been a lurker on this forum for a long time but never posted. However, the current discussion has led me to shed my toga of invisibility and finally say something.

Puma, with all due respect while your last long piece was quite eloquent, I think you are failing to see the bigger picture as to what is in the interest of Inter. Also, you quoted Susy Campanale to buttress your point about Mourinho being disrespectful ? You know her antecedents, right ? And you think she is going to be neutral on these matters ?

The first instincts of Italy, like for many countries, is parochialism. Who are you to make you think you are a better coach than the ones we have ? Especially in Italy, the land of coaches ?! In fact it's this attempt to confront this kind of thinking that led Mourinho to utter his infamous "I am not one from the bottle, I am a special one" comment. The question that precipitated that quote was the journalist asking for his reaction to Ranieri's departing words that Mourinho would suffer to adapt to England. Of course wouldn't you concede that Ranieri said that purely out of spite as he had just been relieved of his duties? And aren't such words meant to undermine the new guy ? If it was someone with shaky confidence and failed to respond to the comment appropriately, that would probably have unraveled the winning mentality he was looking to instill in his team and his efforts to exorcise their "beautiful loser" reputation. Because at the first sign of problem, the players will remember Ranieri's words and wonder if the coach isn't truly having problems adapting. So the full reply was to tell Ranieri via the press that he had beaten teams from England, Spain and even Ranieri's own Italy on his way to the CL trophy and that he was not some clueless alternative.

Ranieri- your so-called gentleman has always been a "voyeur" (that word again) when it comes to Mourinho. After all, he won't have been sacked at Chelsea were it not for the latter. I'll give you two instances. First after he lost a friendly, he said without any provocation whatsoever, "I am not like Mourinho who has to win for his self-esteem". This led to Mourinho's first verbal assault about how Ranieri was 70 and had never won anything significant. The second one is the latest about Mourinho's method being a ticking time-bomb, which leads me to the justification of why I think Puma's piece abjectly failed to see what was in Inter's interest; If you as the leader of a group blithely accepts someone publicly undermining your method of working with millionaire star players who can revolt anytime, you should pack up and go home because the next time you have a quarrel with one of your boys, don't be surprised if he quotes Ranieri's words verbatim back at you. This is probably why Mourinho responded with overwhelming force, as he is wont to do and the funny thing is that I am sure Ranieri will never learn the lesson because he knows most people are suckers and will keep calling Ranieri the gentleman anyway irrespective of the merits of the case. You notice this is the second time, I have brought up the possibility that Ranieri's word could be veritably used to undermine harmony in Mourinho's team. It's the height of naivete to think that Ranieri wasn't similarly trying to play the mind games that is globally-acknowledged to be Mourinho's forte.

Of course, this is no excuse of Mourinho. Someone made a very cogent statement and wondered whether his results couldn't be achieved with less rancor. In that case, to each his own. As for me, I enjoy most of the spat. But, for instance, I thought it was unnecessary what he said about Del Neri's stint at Porto, what he said about Jesualdo Ferreira (Porto's coach), his comments about Reading's ambulance service after Cech's incident. But something like the handcuff gesture is so lame and mild that there is no denying FIGC wanted to teach him a lesson and must have hoped that Morratti will ditch him if the problem becomes too much. I mean Di Canio got a 10,000 Euro fine for a Nazi salute for Christ's sake. NAZI-F*KING Salute versus handcuff. Take your pick.

And do you even notice that in most cases, it's someone starting it off with Mourinho and yet he gets blamed? Ancelotti ridiculed his playing career and no one said anything (Gabriel Marcotti, the respected Times of London and Wall Street Journal columnist actually defended Carlo, calling the comment a joke. I wonder if the person on the receiving end of that joke thought so). Lo Monaco claimed he was going to smash his teeth and there was no uproar. Napoli's president for no reason said he had no need for him except to act in his movies yet no one said anything. When he moans about England all the time, it's because the game in England probably thrives less on this 24/7 football talk as it does in Italy and most of his mouth-offs were more amusing. And do you notice that rarely do you find a President in England, idle enough to start talking about how a club should be ashamed of its victory? Did anybody in Italy condemn Sensi ? What if an Inter player brutishly hacked an opponent down like Totti did ? All Balotelli ever does is flop and put his finger to his lips, yet when he was savagely kicked by Roma's legend, even respected coaches came out to defend him.

It is certainly true that there are coaches who MAY achieve Mourinho's triumphs with less rancor but as Luka once noted, they will throw us to the dogs at the first sign of weakness. If you don't appreciate how much he plays the role of Moggi/Sensi/Lo Monaco for us, you should at least please not knock it. After all we all know Moratti is too much of the "real gentleman" to wallow in their dirty game.

I HAVE NEVER READ ANY OF THESE EXHAUSTING ARTICLES BY ANY OF YOU POSTERS, UNTIL TODAY!

:star::star::star::star::star: 5 STAR SALUTE!

:thumbsup::thumbsup: 2 THUMBS UP!

BRILLIANT FUCKING POST!
 

Gazebo

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Nice, almost perfect two years of Mourinho in Italy. But he already has his head in Madrid, and not only for the Champions League final.
 

Alcatraz

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Nice, almost perfect two years of Mourinho in Italy. But he already has his head in Madrid, and not only for the Champions League final.

I really hope he reconsiders his RealM-thoughts,he'll never become happy at that club.
For example take a look at the game at Camp Nou,a brilliant,warrior-like defensive masterpiece.....by italian-and maybe german-standarts.In Spain they'll call it destructive-even if they win.
I've heard 2/3 of Madrid supporters are against him and his'destructive'standarts anyway.
He should stay here for a couple of years more,Moratti will give him basically free control over the transfers and money will be the last problem...
Then he can move on to his beloved England-one far away day!
 

blackmore

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I have been a lurker on this forum for a long time but never posted. However, the current discussion has led me to shed my toga of invisibility and finally say something.

Puma, with all due respect while your last long piece was quite eloquent, I think you are failing to see the bigger picture as to what is in the interest of Inter. Also, you quoted Susy Campanale to buttress your point about Mourinho being disrespectful ? You know her antecedents, right ? And you think she is going to be neutral on these matters ?

The first instincts of Italy, like for many countries, is parochialism. Who are you to make you think you are a better coach than the ones we have ? Especially in Italy, the land of coaches ?! In fact it's this attempt to confront this kind of thinking that led Mourinho to utter his infamous "I am not one from the bottle, I am a special one" comment. The question that precipitated that quote was the journalist asking for his reaction to Ranieri's departing words that Mourinho would suffer to adapt to England. Of course wouldn't you concede that Ranieri said that purely out of spite as he had just been relieved of his duties? And aren't such words meant to undermine the new guy ? If it was someone with shaky confidence and failed to respond to the comment appropriately, that would probably have unraveled the winning mentality he was looking to instill in his team and his efforts to exorcise their "beautiful loser" reputation. Because at the first sign of problem, the players will remember Ranieri's words and wonder if the coach isn't truly having problems adapting. So the full reply was to tell Ranieri via the press that he had beaten teams from England, Spain and even Ranieri's own Italy on his way to the CL trophy and that he was not some clueless alternative.

Ranieri- your so-called gentleman has always been a "voyeur" (that word again) when it comes to Mourinho. After all, he won't have been sacked at Chelsea were it not for the latter. I'll give you two instances. First after he lost a friendly, he said without any provocation whatsoever, "I am not like Mourinho who has to win for his self-esteem". This led to Mourinho's first verbal assault about how Ranieri was 70 and had never won anything significant. The second one is the latest about Mourinho's method being a ticking time-bomb, which leads me to the justification of why I think Puma's piece abjectly failed to see what was in Inter's interest; If you as the leader of a group blithely accepts someone publicly undermining your method of working with millionaire star players who can revolt anytime, you should pack up and go home because the next time you have a quarrel with one of your boys, don't be surprised if he quotes Ranieri's words verbatim back at you. This is probably why Mourinho responded with overwhelming force, as he is wont to do and the funny thing is that I am sure Ranieri will never learn the lesson because he knows most people are suckers and will keep calling Ranieri the gentleman anyway irrespective of the merits of the case. You notice this is the second time, I have brought up the possibility that Ranieri's word could be veritably used to undermine harmony in Mourinho's team. It's the height of naivete to think that Ranieri wasn't similarly trying to play the mind games that is globally-acknowledged to be Mourinho's forte.

Of course, this is no excuse of Mourinho. Someone made a very cogent statement and wondered whether his results couldn't be achieved with less rancor. In that case, to each his own. As for me, I enjoy most of the spat. But, for instance, I thought it was unnecessary what he said about Del Neri's stint at Porto, what he said about Jesualdo Ferreira (Porto's coach), his comments about Reading's ambulance service after Cech's incident. But something like the handcuff gesture is so lame and mild that there is no denying FIGC wanted to teach him a lesson and must have hoped that Morratti will ditch him if the problem becomes too much. I mean Di Canio got a 10,000 Euro fine for a Nazi salute for Christ's sake. NAZI-F*KING Salute versus handcuff. Take your pick.

And do you even notice that in most cases, it's someone starting it off with Mourinho and yet he gets blamed? Ancelotti ridiculed his playing career and no one said anything (Gabriel Marcotti, the respected Times of London and Wall Street Journal columnist actually defended Carlo, calling the comment a joke. I wonder if the person on the receiving end of that joke thought so). Lo Monaco claimed he was going to smash his teeth and there was no uproar. Napoli's president for no reason said he had no need for him except to act in his movies yet no one said anything. When he moans about England all the time, it's because the game in England probably thrives less on this 24/7 football talk as it does in Italy and most of his mouth-offs were more amusing. And do you notice that rarely do you find a President in England, idle enough to start talking about how a club should be ashamed of its victory? Did anybody in Italy condemn Sensi ? What if an Inter player brutishly hacked an opponent down like Totti did ? All Balotelli ever does is flop and put his finger to his lips, yet when he was savagely kicked by Roma's legend, even respected coaches came out to defend him.

It is certainly true that there are coaches who MAY achieve Mourinho's triumphs with less rancor but as Luka once noted, they will throw us to the dogs at the first sign of weakness. If you don't appreciate how much he plays the role of Moggi/Sensi/Lo Monaco for us, you should at least please not knock it. After all we all know Moratti is too much of the "real gentleman" to wallow in their dirty game.

luka is that you....HAHAHAHA:lol::lol:
 

SeppBlatterJesusBloodline

Primavera
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Its not hard to enjoy Mourinho's antics as long as he does not coach Chelsea or any other primer league club.
 

Lisa

Primavera
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Its not hard to enjoy Mourinho's antics as long as he does not coach Chelsea or any other primer league club.

Maybe he will go to your club eventually. I suppose that you probably know that Sir Alex Ferguson likes him very much.:lol:
anyway, he will be back to England one day.
 
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